The Words of Martin Luther King Jr. Reverberate in a Tumultuous Time

Martin Luther King Jr. was born in Atlanta, Georgia on January 15th, 1929. He was a pivotal advocate for African Americans during the Civil Rights Movement in the United States.
King experienced racism from an early age, and those events stayed with and eventually brought him to a life of activism. After graduating college with a doctorate degree in theology, King became a pastor in Alabama. He began a series of peaceful protests in the south that eventually changed many laws dealing with the equality of African Americans. King gave hundreds of moving speeches across the country, and in 1964 was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.
On April 4th, 1968,  Dr. King was shot and killed while in Memphis, Tennessee. Although his life ended that day, the work that he had accomplished changed the nation. King will be remembered not only for his commitment to the cause of equality for African Americans but also for his profound speeches that moved so many.
MLK Jr.’s words were spoken with hope that the future for African Americans would be brighter and that they would finally be given the equality they deserved.
The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. waving to the crowd during the March on Washington in 1963 at the Lincoln Memorial, where he gave his “I Have a Dream” speech.
The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. waving to the crowd during the March on Washington in 1963 at the Lincoln Memorial, where he gave his “I Have a Dream” speech.Credit…Central Press/Getty Images

By Audra D. S. BurchJohn Eligon and Michael Wines

He lived and died in a time of tumult and a racial awakening, so perhaps it is no surprise that the 35th national celebration of the life and legacy of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on Monday has particular resonance amid one of the most traumatic seasons in memory: A raging pandemic. Protest and civil unrest after the killing of Black people by the police. A momentous election. And an insurrection.

Even the title of his final book — “Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?” — seems ripped from today’s headlines.

“I think it’s still an unanswered question,” said Clayborne Carson, a history professor at Stanford University, referring to the title of Dr. King’s book.

“I think the most important word in that question is ‘we’ — who are we, and until you figure that out, it’s very hard to tell where we are going,” said Dr. Carson, who is also the founder and director of the Martin Luther King Jr. Research and Education Institute, which is publishing a collection of Dr. King’s papers.

Amid the change and upheaval, the words of Dr. King, both those celebrated and the less familiar, feel more urgent then perhaps ever before, both as a guide and a warning. From oft-quoted speeches to the words he never had a chance to deliver before his assassination, Dr. King talked about his vision of a just world, about the power of peaceful protests, and about disruption as the language of the unseen and the unheard.

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We asked Dr. Carson and others from across the country to choose words from Dr. King and reflect on how they resonate today. Here’s what they had to say.

“Now, let me say as I move to my conclusion that we’ve got to give ourselves to this struggle until the end. Nothing would be more tragic than to stop at this point, in Memphis. We’ve got to see it through.”

— from the last speech given by Dr. King, on April 3, 1968, in Memphis, the day before he was assassinated.

The Rev. Dr. William Barber II, a chairman of the Poor People’s Campaign, said Dr. King’s words spoke to the daunting challenge that civil rights leaders faced helping the poor and marginalized. He drew a parallel to today’s challenges of systemic racism, ecological devastation and a lack of access to health care.

The election of a Democratic president, he said, is no reason to slow down.

“It’s not enough to have an election and put new people into office,” Dr. Barber said. “We must push and continue to push for the kind of public policy that really establishes justice.”

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“We really must now go about the business of lifting up those who are poor and those without health care,” he added. “That’s the only way we can heal the nation — we have to heal the body.”

Dr. King, center, with (from left to right) Mathew Ahmann, Floyd McKissick, Eugene Carson Blake and Cleveland Robinson during the March on Washington.
Dr. King, center, with (from left to right) Mathew Ahmann, Floyd McKissick, Eugene Carson Blake and Cleveland Robinson during the March on Washington.Credit…Robert W. Kelley/The LIFE Picture Collection, via Getty Images

“The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice.”

— from Dr. King’s speech at the Washington National Cathedral on March 31, 1968.

Connie Field said Dr. King’s quote had guided much of her work as an award-winning documentary filmmaker.RACE/RELATED: A deep and provocative exploration of race, identity and society with New York Times journalists.Sign Up

“Dr. King presented a vision of an equal, multiracial society,” she said. “He presented a vision of economic equality. And he presented a vision of a political struggle that’s nonviolent. Those are three things that we can all try to live by and strive for today.”

She added: “What’s going on in the United States, what we witnessed on Jan. 6, all has to do with a backlash to the fact that our world is changing. It’s going on here in America; it’s going on in Europe. We’re becoming a more intertwined world, a more multicultural world. That’s the trajectory of history, and there’s no going back on that. That quote completely underscores everything I’m talking about — a just world is an equal world, equal no matter what our race is.”

“Even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream. I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.”

— from Dr. King’s “I Have a Dream” speech at the March on Washington on Aug. 28, 1963.

Bernard Lafayette, 80, recalled the words from the “I Have a Dream” speech as a reminder that the turmoil the country is witnessing today “is not the way things have to be, and it’s not something we have to accept,” but should be understood as another step on the long journey that Dr. King described, with each shift connected to the events that precede it.

The violence at the Capitol, he said, reflected the fear from some members of our society that they were losing political power.

“You have to ask the question, ‘What are these people afraid of?’ Well, they are afraid they would lose power, they would lose control and the election in Georgia exacerbated that,” he said. “These fears that are being perpetrated, they’re really false fears, because no one is going to take anything away from them.”

Marchers gathered in Washington in August for an event celebrating the 57th anniversary of the March on Washington where Dr. King made his “I Have a Dream” speech.
Marchers gathered in Washington in August for an event celebrating the 57th anniversary of the March on Washington where Dr. King made his “I Have a Dream” speech.Credit…Christopher Lee for The New York Times

“I may not get there with you, but I want you to know tonight, that we, as a people, will get to the Promised Land.”

— from Dr. King speech in Memphis on April 3, 1968, a day before he was assassinated.

Rutha Mae Harris, 80, of Albany, Ga., said she believed Dr. King’s speeches often warned of the kind of conflict that unfolded in Washington on Jan. 6. Ms. Harris, who marched with Dr. King during the civil rights era, recalled, in particular, the famous speech he gave in Memphis a day before he was killed.

“With the rhetoric of Trump, I myself knew that something would happen,” she said. “This had been building up for four years.” She said Dr. King was a man of vision, but that the vision captured the darkness as well as the light. She noted, “He said, ‘I might not get there with you,’ and, of course, you can read in between the lines.”

“Why America May Go to Hell”

— title of a sermon that Dr. King had planned to deliver at his church on Sunday, April 7, 1968.

For the Rev. Amos C. Brown, the pastor of Third Baptist Church, a historically Black church in San Francisco founded in 1852, the words of Dr. King that come to mind this year are the ones he never had a chance to speak.

When he was assassinated, Dr. King had been planning to give a sermon, he said, called “Why America May Go to Hell.” In the sermon, Dr. King planned to warn that the country needed to use its vast resources to end poverty, and to offer all of God’s children the necessities of life.

The hell that Dr. King stood against is still deeply embedded in America today, said Mr. Brown, who is attending the inauguration as a guest of Vice President-elect Kamala Harris (who attends his church).

“We are about to fall over the precipice into, figuratively speaking, hell in this nation — sure, we ought to be concerned about what’s going on now,” he said, referring to the attack on the Capitol. “But people are just now beginning to experience what Black folk have gone through since the Atlantic slave trade began. Hell.”

A view of the audience over Dr. King’s shoulder as he delivered a speech at the Gillfield Baptist Church, in Petersburg, Va., in 1960.
A view of the audience over Dr. King’s shoulder as he delivered a speech at the Gillfield Baptist Church, in Petersburg, Va., in 1960.Credit…Howard Sochurek/The LIFE Picture Collection, via Getty Images

“We must learn to live together as brothers or perish together as fools.”

— from Dr. King’s speech in St. Louis on March 22, 1964.

For Antwan T. Lang, a member of the Chatham County Board of Elections in Savannah, Ga., Dr. King’s words meant we cannot be afraid to learn from one another and understand our differences and similarities.

“My hope is that one day white America will understand that we harvest no hate, but we want to be seen not as a Black man, Black entrepreneur, Black superintendent, Black doctor, Black lawyer, Black teacher, Black insurance agent, Black funeral director, but as a human being wanting to freely be ourselves without having to walk on eggshells in fear of becoming a statistic,” he said.

“It is clear to me that our protest and our plea to America is that we want to be free, to simply be a human being with real feelings, emotions, dreams and goals,” Mr. Lang said, “to be able to live long enough to accomplish those goals, dreams and ambitions.”

“Oh no, Brother Gray. This is no ploy at all. If we are to succeed, I am now convinced that an absolutely nonviolent method must be ours amid the vast hostilities we face.”

— Dr. King’s response in 1955 to a suggestion that his nonviolence tactics were for attention.

Fred D. Gray was the lawyer who represented Rosa Parks, Dr. King and the Montgomery Improvement Association during the Montgomery bus boycott in 1955, the event that inaugurated the 20th century’s civil rights movement. The quote, found in Mr. Gray’s account of that battle, “Bus Ride to Justice,” was Dr. King’s response to a suggestion that his commitment to nonviolence was a ploy to gain attention in the press.

“I became a lawyer so I could use the law for the purpose of destroying every act of segregation that I could find,” Mr. Gray said. “There were other people whose roles were to make speeches, and others who demonstrated, but you had to put it all together and do it in a nonviolent fashion.”

Regarding the protests over the past year against killings of unarmed African-Americans by police officers, Mr. Gray said: “I think we’re going to have to go back to what Martin said about nonviolence and social change. All the things that Dr. King did, all the things we did in the Montgomery bus boycott were to get rid of racism and inequality. We were able to do a little bit, but not do it all.”

Ellen Barry, Elizabeth Dias and Richard Fausset contributed reporting. Susan C. Beachy contributed research.

John Eligon is a Kansas City-based national correspondent covering race. He previously worked as a reporter in Sports and Metro, and his work has taken him to Nelson Mandela’s funeral in South Africa and the Winter Olympics in Turin. @jeligon

Michael Wines writes about voting and other election-related issues. Since joining The Times in 1988, he has covered the Justice Department, the White House, Congress, Russia, southern Africa, China and various other topics.  @miwine

Sources: https://www.keepinspiring.me/martin-luther-king-jr-quotes/

CHIC NYC

Chic NYC official brand trademark

RUNWAY WE ARE THE CITY THAT FOUNDED FASHION – WE ARE CHIC NYC RUNWAY

We are not fast fashion, nore claim to be. We are RUNWAY.

Awarded Fastest Growing 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018 & 2019

Awarded most online visitors by Shopify & featured in Go RiverWalk 2017 

Achieved American Express Platinum Status in 2018

Awarded for Sustainable Fashion in 2020 with 100% organic clothing

New York City is the first city to ever host an organized Fashion Show known as the famous New York Fashion Week. This iconic week started in 1943 and today, the show continues to be the the most watched fashion show in the world by every single industry every September & February of every calendar year.

All eyes are on us, New York City, to bring the next fashion trends that the globe will view from magazines, newspapers, movies, books, social media, the internet and more. That is where CHIC NYC RUNWAY comes in. We take our team of talented creative directors, buyers and manufactures to create the most classic and timeless styles from sustainable fabrics. We are not a fast fashion boutique or online store that literally destroys our globe…. nore do we want to be. We take our time in providing you 100% sustainable clothing. Our main goal is to make you runway ready no matter what city you call home.

We know that our customers are busy, either on the road traveling or building their careers. Therefore, comfort is key to our styles. We search for styles that will keep you Chic while still being able to keep you on the move. 

Today, CHIC NYC RUNWAY is a registered, trademarked and privately held corporation in the United States with locations in the USA, Europe and China. We also sell our brand in stores across the globe in stores, department stores and boutiques. We have been featured by magazines, celebrities, influencers, TV host and press outlets, as well as New York Fashion Week.

Inspiration of Clothing: New York City has been the only major city where international styles come together and create masterpieces. It is reported that in the 1950’s & 1960’s that more than 65% of the residents residing and living in NYC were from international backgrounds (Europe, Asia, South America, etc), therefore, creating a melting pot of fashions and styles for the world to watch. It is then that the city became a Fashion Icon, creating the garment district where thousands of New Yorkers were employed to create garments in the heart of Manhattan and distribute to the world. Thanks to the countless hours these workers put in to creating this energy, NYC became the go to place to purchase or create new fashions globally. Today, many fashion designers have taken their design houses to China, where the market is filled with new talent and technology. Chic NYC is proud to announce that we operate in the USA, China and Europe so we can make certain our vision hits local and global markets alike, along with offering our customers from every country the ability to purchase the official CHIC NYC RUNWAY.

Shop the Official CHIC NYC today. All online orders come with beautiful CHIC NYC Runway trademark gift packaging and tissue paper. Creating the perfect gift for yourself or a special someone. What city is your runway? Buy today and become CHIC ready.

Due to the nature of our garments, CHIC NYC does not offer a refund, repair or exchange policy due to health reasonings. We feel all customers should receive a brand new product, made just for them. All sales are final as displayed on our policies page. To learn more visit the policies page found on our website. Final Sales includes repairs, exchanges or refunds as Chic NYC does not hold responsibility to repair, exchange or refund when purchasing from http://www.chicnycrunway.com online store. If purchased in store, repairs may be made by the tailor, however, only if damaged within 7 days of purchasing in store. When purchasing online, Chic NYC does not offer a refund, exchange or repair on any orders or garments.

REPRESENT OUR BRAND AND BECOME A ROYAL AMBASSADOR TODAY.

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AVENTINO WATCHES

Aventino Watches

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EAGLES HAVE BEEN SYMBOLS OF VISION AND LEADERSHIP IN ALL OF HISTORY. ROME WAS KNOWN FOR THE EAGLE STANDARD, SOLDIERS GUARDED THIS EMBLEM WITH THEIR LIVES. AVENTINO WATCH BRAND; WAS INSPIRED BY THE ROMAN CITY AND THE STRENGTH OF SOLDIERS WHO RISKED EVERYTHING TO PROTECT THE STANDARD.

THE AVENTNO HILLS HAS A UNIQUE PLACE IN THE FOUNDATION OF ROME. THE RISE OF THIS ONCE INSIGNIFICANT CITY INSPIRED THE EVENTUAL CREATION OF A UNIQUE PRODUCT LINE THAT REPRESENTS OUR VISION AND LEADERSHIP DRIVE. OUR PRODUCTS REPRESENT OUR UNFLINCHING DESIRE TO CREATE AND PROTECT AN UNBEATABLE FASHION STANDARD.

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AFFORDABILITY IS CORE

WE NOT ONLY TELL TIME, AVENTINO IS A STORY THAT DEFINES TIME AND CHANGES THE WAY TIME IS USED. WITH OUR COST-EFFECTIVE TIME PIECES, YOU CAN SHOW UP LOOKING LIKE YOU RUN AN EMPIRE WITHOUT EMPTYING YOUR BANK ACCOUNT. AFFORDABILITY IS A CORE VALUE FOR US; WITH OUR PRICES FROM AS LOW AS 69€

EVERY PRODUCT, HAS A PERSONAL TOUCH FROM THE AVENTINO TEAM. OUR TEAM IS MADE UP OF YOUNG AND VERSATILE FASHION AND STYLE ENTHUSIASTS WITH A GLOBAL OUTLOOK. EACH WATCH HAS ITS PARTS FINISHED TO THE TINIEST DETAILS TO ENSURE HIGHEST LEVELS OF ACCURACY AND EASY CALIBRATION.

WE DESIGN EVERY AVENTINO PRODUCT AND PARTNER WITH THE WORLD’S LEADING MANUFACTURERS.

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The True Meaning of Friendship

What is it that makes a true friend?

Happy Friendship Wallpapers HD for National Friendship Day | PixelsTalk.Net

The Japanese have a term, kenzoku, which translated literally means “family.” The connotation suggests a bond between people who’ve made a similar commitment and who possibly therefore share a similar destiny. It implies the presence of the deepest connection of friendship, of lives lived as comrades from the distant past.

Many of us have people in our lives with whom we feel the bond described by the word kenzoku. They may be family members, a mother, a brother, a daughter, a cousin. Or a friend from grammar school with whom we haven’t talked in decades. Time and distance do nothing to diminish the bond we have with these kinds of friends.

The question then arises: why do we have the kind of chemistry encapsulated by the word kenzoku with only a few people we know and not scores of others? The closer we look for the answer the more elusive it becomes. It may not in fact be possible to know, but the characteristics that define a kenzoku relationship most certainly are.

What draws people together as friends?

  1. Common interests. This probably ties us closer to our friends than many would like to admit. When our interests diverge and we can find nothing to enjoy jointly, time spent together tends to rapidly diminish. Not that we can’t still care deeply about friends with whom we no longer share common interests, but it’s probably uncommon for such friends to interact on a regular basis.
  2. History. Nothing ties people together, even people with little in common, than having gone through the same difficult experience. As the sole glue to keep friendships whole in the long run, however, it often dries, cracks, and ultimately fails.
  3. Common values. Though not necessarily enough to create a friendship, if values are too divergent, it’s difficult for a friendship to thrive.
  4. Equality. If one friend needs the support of the other on a consistent basis such that the person depended upon receives no benefit other than the opportunity to support and encourage, while the relationship may be significant and valuable, it can’t be said to define a true friendship.

What makes a friend worthy of the name?

  1. A commitment to your happiness. A true friend is consistently willing to put your happiness before your friendship. It’s said that “good advice grates on the ear,” but a true friend won’t refrain from telling you something you don’t want to hear, something that may even risk fracturing the friendship, if hearing it lies in your best interest. A true friend will not lack the mercy to correct you when you’re wrong. A true friend will confront you with your drinking problem as quickly as inform you about a malignant-looking skin lesion on your back that you can’t see yourself.
  2. Not asking you to place the friendship before your principles. A true friend won’t ask you to compromise your principles in the name of your friendship or anything else. Ever.
  3. A good influence. A true friend inspires you to live up to your best potential, not to indulge your basest drives.

Of course, we may have friends who fit all these criteria and still don’t quite feel kenzoku. There still seems to be an extra factor, an attraction similar to that which draws people together romantically, that cements friends together irrevocably, often immediately, for no reason either person can identify. But when you find these people, these kenzoku, they’re like priceless gems. They’re like finding home.

How to attract true friends

This one is easy, at least on paper: become a true friend yourself. One of my favorite quotations comes from Gandhi: “Be the change you wish to see in the world.” Be the friend you want to have. We all tend to attract people into our lives whose character mirrors our own. You don’t have to make yourself into what you think others would find attractive. No matter what your areas of interest, others share them somewhere. Simply make yourself a big target. Join social clubs organized around activities you enjoy. Leverage the Internet to find people of like mind. Take action.

As I thought about it, there are four people in my life I consider kenzoku. How many do you?

My book, The Undefeated Mind: On the Science of Constructing an Indestructible Self, is available now; read the sample chapter and visit Amazon or Barnes & Noble to order your copy.

Source: https://www.psychologytoday.com/intl/blog/happiness-in-world/201312/the-true-meaning-friendship

SIAMO TUTTI MIGRANTI ALLA RICERCA DI UN MONDO MIGLIORE

Il Progetto “SU.PR.EME. ITALIA” – promosso anche dal nostro Comune – ha come finalità il reperimento di immobili residenziali privati da destinare alla locazione in favore di cittadini immigrati regolari in condizioni di disagio abitativo

Oggi si parla tanto di migranti e immigrazione, e ricordare la storia significa anche creare collegamenti tra il passato e il presente: la condizione in cui oggi si trovano tante persone è molto simile a quella in cui si sono ritrovati gli italiani a cavallo tra l’Ottocento e il Novecento. Stiamo parlando della “Grande Emigrazione”, che portò nove milioni di persone da nord a sud ad emigrare in America per andare alla ricerca della fortuna.

È un po’ ció che accade oggi a tutti quei migranti che intraprendono il lungo e doloroso viaggio della speranza, per andare alla ricerca di un futuro migliore per sé e le proprie famiglie.

Siamo tutti migranti alla ricerca di un mondo migliore, ed a tutti quanti noi fanno paura parole come: fame, povertà, guerra. Oggi, in tutte le società multietniche, una delle più grandi sfide é proprio quella di gestire le differenze. L’alterità non può essere eliminata o assimilata ma é necessario intraprendere le vie dell’incontro e della convivenza pacifica.  

Ancora oggi lo straniero continua ad essere associato a qualcosa di negativo e di minaccioso. Nel corso del tempo si è parlato di eliminazione, di assimilazione, di segregazione come la condizione degli ebrei che venivano ghettizzati e che nel periodo brutale del nazismo venivano considerati come entità staccate dal resto della società.

Troppo spesso si utilizza ancora il termine di integrazione quando in realtà occorre parlare di inclusione e di interculturalitá. La persona non dev’essere semplicemente integrata in una comunità, ma deve poter essere inclusa ed essere un partecipante attivo. Spesso i pregiudizi possono condizionare questo processo, generando una chiusura della persona in sé stessa perché non compresa.

I migranti arricchiscono?

É necessario partire dall’educazione sia a scuola ma soprattutto in famiglia, per cercare di diffondere un’ottica più aperta nei confronti del diverso. L’altro arricchisce la nostra vita, perché ci consente di scoprire nuove culture, religioni, lingue, tradizioni. Dobbiamo essere disposti ad aprire le frontiere del nostro cuore, perché il razzismo è un cancro silenzioso che aspetta il momento opportuno per discriminare, senza guardare in faccia nessuno.

Il rifiuto dell’altro ed anche la sua ingiusta discriminazione, è il tentativo di salvaguardare il sé e la propria identità perché ci si sente minacciati dalla diversità. Continuare a vivere in una società multietnica in cui si ha paura del diverso vuol dire non vivere. Non è con la paura, con la gerarchizzazione delle culture e la chiusura che si progredisce, ma con la valorizzazione delle unicità. Non possiamo annullare le differenze, perché queste esistono da sempre ed esisteranno sempre. La conoscenza e la curiosità sono importanti per imparare ad avere meno paura. Accettiamo le differenze e facciamo in modo che queste sussistano.

Progetto “SU.PR.EME. ITALIA”

A tal riguardo la Commissione Europea – Direzione Generale Migrazione e Affari interni ha approvato il Progetto “SU.PR.EME. ITALIA” – FAMI 2014/2020 – EMAS (Emergency Assistance) – Grant Agreement, che vede coinvolti, in partnership, Ministero del Lavoro e delle Politiche Sociali, in qualità di lead applicant in partenariato con la Regione Puglia, la Regione Basilicata, la Regione Calabria, la Regione Campania, la Regione Sicilia, l’Ispettorato Nazionale del Lavoro, l’Organizzazione internazionale per le migrazioni e il Consorzio Nova. Tale iniziativa – promossa anche dal nostro Comune – ha come finalità il reperimento di immobili residenziali privati da destinare alla locazione in favore di cittadini immigrati regolari in condizioni di disagio abitativo.

Agenzia sociale per l’abitare

E nello specifico Agenzia sociale per l’abitare è il nome del progetto nato per fronteggiare l’emergenza abitativa dei migranti regolari che vivono nelle baracche di Contrada Russo.
Nata su proposta del Comune di Taurianova, Agenzia sociale per l’abitare verrà gestita dal Consorzio Macramè di Reggio Calabria, attivo da anni sul tema dell’accoglienza nel territorio calabrese. Ha l’obiettivo di ridurre l’emarginazione sociale dei migranti regolari, di promuovere l’inclusione sociale, favorire forme di accoglienza diffusa.https://www.youtube.com/embed/dWK_a1TBNy4?feature=oembed

Scrive in una nota il sindaco Biasi con l’assessore Crea (per le pari opportunità e politiche sociali) e l’assessore Fedele (all’immigrazione): “Diventa, pertanto, essenziale collocare al centro del progetto le persone accolte, le quali non devono essere meri beneficiari passivi di interventi predisposti in loro favore, ma protagonisti attivi del proprio percorso di accoglienza e di inclusione sociale”.

Al progetto possono aderire tutti i proprietari di case sfitte e abitabili nel comune di Taurianova, disponibili a destinarle in locazione in favore di migranti regolari in condizione di disagio socio-abitativo. L’Agenzia sociale per l’abitare selezionerà le case, offrirà ai proprietari servizio di accompagnamento nella fase preliminare di stipula del contratto di affitto, individuerà i potenziali inquilini, curerà il loro inserimento abitativo. Il comune di Taurianova attiverà una serie di garanzie, voucher integrativi in favore dei proprietari e agevolazioni economiche e sociali. I proprietari potranno avere la certezza di un reddito dall’affitto, sperimentare in prima persona un progetto innovativo di accoglienza.

Come comunità noi taurianovesi potremmo dar vita a delle opportunità, a delle attività o progetti rivolti alla conoscenza di culture diverse, perché è sempre più bello conoscere nuovi orizzonti che tracciare confini. Il pittore spagnolo, Pablo Picasso diceva: “non giudicare sbagliato ció che non conosci, prendi l’occasione per comprendere”. 

Fonte: https://www.taurianovatalk.it/news/2021/01/11/siamo-tutti-migranti/?fbclid=IwAR2q2Hdpw-P-FwqIrmDNVUZ5eW-Tt2q28-hMES0R9-gHptXMEevEGq-nhVI

Hope

Why Is Hope So Important?

To have hope is to want an outcome that makes your life better in some way. It not only can help make a tough present situation more bearable but also can eventually improve our lives because envisioning a better future motivates you to take the steps to make it happen.

Whether we think about it or not, hope is a part of everyone’s life. Everyone hopes for something. It’s an inherent part of being a human being. Hope helps us define what we want in our futures and is part of the self-narrative about our lives we all have running inside our minds.

Why Acceptance Isn’t Weakness

What Is Hope, Exactly?

The definition of hope can differ depending on the person doing the talking. When people speak about hope in a spiritual context, it might mean believing good things will happen with faith in a higher power. They might direct their hopes outward in prayer.

For others, it might mean always looking on the bright side and seeing challenges as opportunities. In other words, always “hoping for the best.”

Merriam-Webster’s definition makes “hope” seem close to “wish”: “to cherish a desire with anticipation: to want something to happen or be true.”

Whatever the details, hope in general means a desire for things to change for the better, and to want that better situation very much.

Upcoming Caregiver Events

Hope Is Not Optimism

Hope is not the same as optimism. An optimistic generally is more hopeful than others. On the other hand, the most pessimistic person you ever met can still be hopeful about something. Hope is very specific and focused, usually on just one issue.

Such as “I hope I get that job I interviewed for” or “I hope she calls me.” Or, for a little kid during the holidays, “I hope I get that bike I wanted!”

Why Hope Is So Vital

Most people associate hope with a dire situation. People hope to get out of difficult circumstances. That is often when people do find themselves hoping fervently! But hope also can provide the key to making everyday life better.

That’s because just envisioning something hopeful – the child seeing herself riding her new bike, for example – gives a person a moment of happiness, according to Psychology Today.  It can make present difficulties much easier to bear.

An example of that is reported by the American Psychology Association. Children who grew up in poverty but had success later in life all had one thing in common – hope. Dr. Valerie Maholmes, who worked on the research, said hope involves “planning and motivation and determination” to get what one hopes for.

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Deeper Meaning

In a way, having hope links your past and present to the future. You have a vision for what you hope will happen. Whether it does not, just envisioning it can make you feel better. And if it’s something you can somewhat control – like the kids working to get out of poverty – then hope can motivate you to take whatever steps you need to take.

Dr. Neel Burton, a book author who writes about emotions, writes that he always asks patients for what they hope for, because if they say “nothing” then that is a sign of depression or worse.

Having hope is important to the very act of being a human being. As Dr. Judith Rich writes, “Hope is a match in a dark tunnel, a moment of light, just enough to reveal the path ahead and ultimately the way out.”

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Source: https://hopegrows.net/news/why-is-hope-so-important

Winter Idioms

Feeling under the weather? Walking on thin ice with your vocabulary variety? These idioms will have a snowball effect on your language use this winter. And they’re just the tip of the iceberg.

Take a chill pill

If you’re going to tell someone to calm down, why not do it in rhyme? “Chill” means a feeling of coldness, as in, “there was a chill in the air.” Sometime in recent decades, probably the 1970s, the word also came to mean “relax”—just imagine a hippie flower child flashing a peace sign and saying “Chill out, dude.”

Eventually, “Take a chill pill” emerged. It might have shown up in the early days of ADD and ADHD medications like Ritalin, which were designed to calm hyperactive folks and therefore very logically dubbed “chill pills.” Other sources attribute the origin of the phrase to 1990s slang, specifically, Buffy the Vampire Slayer. If you’re stressed about the actual origin, we’ve got one thing to say: take a chill pill.

Cold shoulder

If Cher turns her back on Dion, Dion will see Cher’s shoulder. And the act shows dismissal or indifference to Dion, so it’s pretty unfriendly, or “cold.” Boom: an idiom is born.

Some unsavory sources claim that a custom back in Shakespearean times was to serve unwelcome guests a “cold shoulder of mutton”—i.e., not the tastiest meal, and a hard-to-miss sign of “would you be so kind as to get out. Now.” But etymologists are chilly on that origin, tending to favor reports that Scottish author Sir Walter Scott coined the phrase “cauld shouther” in 1816. With that literary proof, you can turn a cold shoulder on the meat story.

Cold turkey

Let’s say you love turkey. You eat it all the time. Then, the doctor tells you it’s bad for you. You better stop eating it—right away. Really? You can’t just slowly ease off it, eating a little less turkey each day until you’re down to none? NO. No more turkey for you.

That’s called “going cold turkey”: abruptly stopping a habit that’s bad for you. People often use this term when they talk about ways to stop smoking or taking a drug, but you can also use it when you’re talking about diet or other habits. The phrase may come from addiction doctors in the 1970s, noting the “cold, clammy feel of the skin during withdrawal,” while its earlier uses (back to the 1800s) have to do with straightforward talk or a sudden occurrence.

(Note: Grammarly is not licensed to give medical opinions about turkey.)

Under the weather

Weather can be nice and sunny or cloudy and miserable. In the case of this idiom, the idea is the latter. If you’re under a raincloud, chances are you’re not going to feel 100% healthy, happy, and ready to party. So if you’re feeling sick, “under the weather” is a way to say so.

If you ever forget, just visualize getting followed around by a raincloud. That should remind you to feel sick. Etymologists believe that the first folks to say it were probably sailors in the 1800s. If you’re feeling sniffly, consider yourself lucky you’re not also on a ship at sea.

In cold blood

“In cold blood” means without mercy or emotion, suggesting that a cruel act was committed in a calculated, unfeeling way. It’s usually used pretty violently: “The victim was murdered in cold blood,” or “Darth Vader killed Obi-Wan in cold blood.”

Etymologists trace the idea to the 1700s or even 1500s. Medicine back then wasn’t exactly what it is now, so people thought that blood got hot in the heat of passion. Therefore, to do something dispassionately was to act “in cold blood.”

If you go on a diet cold turkey, you might feel like you did this to yourself in cold blood. It’s just that painful.

Snowball effect

If something has a snowball effect, that means it might start out small, but keeps growing in importance. Just picture it: a snowball is rolling down a snowy hill, and as it rolls, it gathers more and more snow, getting bigger and bigger. Next thing you know, you’re running from an avalanche.

While an avalanche is usually bad, a snowball effect can be a bad thing or a good thing. You buy an Xbox, and then a trip to Cancun, and then a car, and then go into debt: that string of purchases has a snowball effect on your finances. Bad. One black woman becomes an engineer, and she paves the way for other minorities to get similar jobs, and that creates a snowball effect that leads to equality in the workplace. Good. (Also the plot of Hidden Figures). One person protests a government, the government arrests him, then more people protest, and back and forth until the government makes reforms or gets overthrown. Could be bad or good, depending on the government. But either way, that first person started a snowball effect.

When hell freezes over

Most notions of hell are that it’s a pretty hot place to be. So the chances that it would freeze there? Pretty much zero. “When hell freezes over” is basically a way to say “never.” There are variations on the “freezing in hell” phrase, too. Here are examples of each: “I suppose you think you can go on living on [the Union] till hell freezes over.” —Guy Wetmore Carryl, The Lieutenant-Governor (the first-recorded use of the phrase was in this book in 1903) “My first writing teacher told me it would be a cold day in hell if I ever won a National Board of Review award.” –Terence Winter (writer of The Wolf of Wall Street) “I don’t think the president’s plan has a snowball’s chance in hell of succeeding.” —General James Conway

Walking on thin ice

Again, this one gives a pretty clear mental picture: you go for a walk on a lake that’s iced over, but if the ice isn’t very thick, you might crack it and fall to a shivery doom. It’s a metaphor for being in a situation that might be dangerous or lead to negative consequences. If a kid is whining a lot and refusing to go to bed, her parents might tell her, “you’re on thin ice.” If an employee has been late to work every day for two weeks and is caught asleep at his desk, he’s probably walking on thin ice with his boss. Variations include “treading on thin ice,” “skating on thin ice,” or just “on thin ice.” The idiom’s first recorded use was in 1841: “In skating over thin ice our safety is in our speed.” —Ralph Waldo EmersonPrudence

The tip of the iceberg

Less than 10 percent of an iceberg’s mass shows up above the water’s surface. That’s why they spell disaster for a fair number of ships, including the famous, Oscar-winning Titanic, which had an accident with the mass that was lurking below. As an idiom, “tip of the iceberg” means a small or visible part of a much bigger issue, and it usually has a negative connotation. For example: Sherlock finds the first clue to a murder, but it’s just the tip of the iceberg in unraveling a grand conspiracy. A classroom is using outdated textbooks because the school can’t afford new editions. But that’s just the tip of the iceberg where funding for education is concerned. On a brighter note, in the musical words of the great cellist Yo-Yo Ma: “I’ve always thought the sound that you make is just the tip of the iceberg, like the person that you see physically is just the tip of the iceberg as well.” That may just be the tip of the iceberg where winter idioms are concerned, but now if you’re put on the spot for a frigid phrase, you’ll have more than a snowball’s chance in hell.

Fonte: https://www.grammarly.com/blog/8-more-wondrous-winter-idioms/?utm_content=link&utm_source=Facebook_org&utm_medium=social&utm_id=DAienlb1llK4I6&fbclid=IwAR2ezhvAXrqNb8IHBoIvSIgquqCImKd-Xr4N5LLrz8fUCL815OToAi86_so